Broods’ Georgia Nott has just released The Venus Project, an album created entirely by a team of women, and it’s been an empowering, emotional journey

Happy International Women’s Day, Big Brains!

What better way to start the day than with some new music created entirely by a team of talented women? The Venus Project: Vol. 1 is available to stream as of this morning, and we spoke to Broods‘ Georgia Nott ahead of its release to learn more about how her decision to start a solo project led to a fully female collaboration, finding strength in her vulnerabilities, and how it felt to be surrounded by other women in the workplace after years of working in a male-dominated industry.

Artwork by Ashley Lukashevsky

Emma Kate Lewis: How’s your week going so far?

Georgia Nott: Good! Just working away, answering a lot of emails… [Laughing]

EKL: I bet it’s busy in the lead up to the release [of The Venus Project: Vol. 1]?

GN: Yeah, I almost forgot how busy the few weeks leading up to a release are. It’s been busy but also so awesome.

EKL: Can you tell me how The Venus Project came to be?

GN: It’s been in the woodworks for quite some time now. I wanted to do a side project; Caleb [Georgia’s older brother and the other half of Broods] and I were both like, “Y’know, it’s time we did something with this other stuff we’ve been making.” We’d both been writing in our own time, and putting together ideas for our solo projects. That, and I guess the world we live in.

I’ve started to think about what I want to do as a feminist, and what I want to say, and how I want to stand up. I see so many women around me who inspire me; the way they stand up for equality and don’t keep their opinions quiet. I thought, “This is my chance to do something, make something, that represents what I stand for and starts a conversation that needs to be had.”

It’s been awesome to be able to find myself in that sense, as well as in the sense of being an artist.

EKL: Is that a big reason why you decided to make your solo project collaboration with other women?

GN: Yeah! I felt it was the perfect way [to do it] with all the stuff I found myself writing—it was very personal, and reveals a lot of what I was thinking [while writing].

It felt right to do, this all female project, and it also felt like the right time. With the way the world is at the moment, it didn’t feel like something I had a choice in.

I couldn’t just have the idea and then be like, “Oh no, never mind, it’s too hard.” Instead I had to be like “I am going to do this!” [Laughing]

EKL: On that note, I think that a lot of—predominantly male—industry professionals seem to argue that it is “too hard” to find females to fill vacancies and meet quotas within the music scene. Yet you’ve put together this album with an entirely female team. So, just how hard was it?

[Laugher]

EKL: It’s ridiculous because there are so many talented women out there to work with!

GN: I agree—it’s not a good argument anymore because there are plenty of women in the industry. It’s just that, to put it bluntly, women have to fight so much harder to be taken seriously. Which is stupid, really stupid. [Laughing]

It was hard for me because essentially this started as a low budget, kinda DIY album running basically on peoples’ passion, and that’s the passion of the women I’ve been working with. For a while I was like, “Am I gonna have to do this by myself?” but then the more people I talked to about it, the more people wanted to be a part of it. And still, even now, we’ve got the album coming out and I’m still getting people who want to be a part of it.

I think that projects like this are part of creating a new artistic expectation within the music industry, and creative industries in general. There should be a chance for women to express their creativity, because it is a special type of creativity. We’re criticised for being “too emotional”, but that’s actually not a weakness. It’s one of the best things about women: their power to be empathetic, to be emotional about things.

EKL: I think that’s what makes a project like this so fantastic—it shows that women can come together and create something wonderful entirely by themselves, and so it makes the whole argument that there aren’t women out there to fill certain roles completely redundant.

GN: I hope that I can keep going with this project, and to keep inviting people to be a part of it. I feel like it’s already had a bit of a snowball effect, and I think it’s really going to flourish in the future. There are all these awesome movements happening worldwide right now that are moving us towards equality; reminding us that we’re all human and deserve the same rights.

Image by Catie Laffoon

EKL: Having listened to the album—I think it’s absolutely beautiful, by the way! Congratulations!

GN: Thank you!

EKL: Most of the songs focus on aspects of the female experience. How much of this was intentional commentary and how much was purely personal? If you can really separate the two…

GN: I think it was from just a personal place at the time, but then I started to realise that there was real universal human quality to what I was making. I think in turn that’s what drove me towards this goal of making a fully female album, because it started off as me just wanting to make a solo album or an EP as side project. Then I realised that the songs I was writing were all coming from a really new place that I’d never been able to write from before. Or rather show people before! [Laughing]

There’s a really feminine quality to the album that I don’t want to feel like I have to change for the sake of making it successful and digestible for all. I wanted to be able to write something and to make something that came from a super authentic, honest place and didn’t apologise for my feelings or emotions as a woman.

They’re my thoughts and feelings that I feel I’ve been needing to express, and doing so has helped me grow into the person that I wanted to be when I started writing this album—somebody unapologetic, and proud to be a woman.

I’m not going to pretend that I feel I’m average at stuff. I’m going to own it. And I’m not going to wait for anybody to tell me that I’m good enough, to be approved… I’m just going to keep doing what I’m doing.

[Laughter]

It’s been so awesome to be able to explore that side of myself as an artist.

EKL: I bet working with an all female team was empowering in that sense.

GN: One of the main things I’ve noticed since starting the project is how empowered I’ve felt.

Sometimes it’s been really overwhelming, you know, with the amount of personal exposure… But it’s also been empowering. I think that just as you can’t be happy without experiencing low periods, you can’t be empowered without also being vulnerable.

EKL: I absolutely agree.

GN: It’s been emotional. Emotions are definitely heightened at the moment! [Laughing]

EKL: I can imagine. It must be really different finally working with an all female team after so many years of being surrounded by predominantly male colleagues. It must be difficult navigating the feelings that come with that new environment, however positive the emotions are.

GN: Yeah, I’ve always worked with Caleb for the most part, so doing my own thing has been an incredible work experience. I’ve given myself a lot more credit than I used to. I’ve been able to produce my own music, and engineer it myself. It’s been nice to give myself time to realise that I can actually do all those things myself, and being able to show that has been really exciting for me.

Image by Catie Laffoon

EKL: Who are some of the women who inspire you most and why?

GN: To be honest, I’m struggling to think of any women who don’t inspire me.

[Laughter]

GN: All of the women who surround me, in one way or another, have positively affected my life and shown me different perspectives that have prompted new conversations and expanded my world. Especially during this project.

I’ve been working with people who don’t shy away from having conversations or telling stories that have been lurking in the shadows; those that people have been trying to pretend aren’t relevant anymore even though the issues they deal with—like racism and sexism—are still so, so present in today’s world. Just being able to surround myself with women who aren’t afraid to have those conversations… I live for that kind of thing.

And women using their art or music or work in general to empower movements and fight for equality. I’m inspired by all of them.

EKL: Last question! What do you hope listeners take away from The Venus Project: Vol. 1?

GN: I think that listeners will hear what’s relevant to them when they listen to it. Pretty much every song on the record comes from a personal place that is quite vulnerable. I hope that when people listen to the songs they see themselves in the record, and accept themselves through this record. That’s basically my goal.

Stream The Venus Project: Vol. 1 now!


Follow The Venus Project on Facebook and Instagram

With thanks to Georgia Nott, Maree Nardone, and Universal Music Australia

Images as individually credited

Compiled, Edited, and Transcribed by Emma Kate Lewis

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