Giselle Au-Nhien Nguyen sits down for a difficult but loving conversation with her mother, Mrs Nguyen, about moving to Australia from Vietnam after the war, and sacrificing a bright future as a concert pianist to start a family. An intimate and moving exchange accompanied by pictures from their family photo albums.

Allie Speers has crafted a personal essay about the importance of language and community in discovering and exploring her sexuality. It’s a touching snapshot of Brisbane and a particular time in a young queer woman’s life. Illustrated by Anna Apuli.

Nayuka Gorrie’s memoir explores the concept of “utopia” and what that might look and feel like for black women in colonised Australia. She talks about the pride in resilience and an ideal future of a black matriarchy.

Jaala Alex photographed a super special fashion shoot called “To Self-rep is to Self-love” featuring Phoebe Sheehy (Phoebe Paradise), Mel Stringer, and Nicole Casella (Yippywhippy) all wearing jewellery and clothing that they themselves make! Shot at Betty’s Espresso & Bar in West End, Brisbane.

“Queer House Chat” is an ambitious and bold piece that records a round-table discussion amongst five housemates, all of whom identify as trans or gender non-binary. They discuss the importance of having a safe space they can retreat to at the end of long days of prejudiced people and systems – including their own families. This conversation is printed alongside photos that Ellery, Mat, Fennix, Arden, and Bowen took of each other (and their pets).

Elise Lawrence reports to us from Japan about women’s-only train carriages. Developed as a response to chikan, 痴漢 (groping) the carriages come as welcome changes to some residents but others are frustrated that they don’t address the roots of systemic sexism. This story includes photos by Elise and illustrations by Anna Apuli.

The Featured Artist for Issue #2 is Ayaka Soga from QArt Gallery. Ayaka’s bright and bold paintings were printed on perforated card pages at the centre of the magazine so readers could tear them out and put them on their walls. Bri Lee profiled Ayaka and they spoke about the important of QArt gallery for artists who have disabilities, to be able to produce and share their work.

Lamisse Hamouda is in-conversation with her friend and human rights lawyer, Fatima Rauf, about growing up Muslim in Australia. They discuss the mould of a “good muslim girl” that they don’t fit, and Fatima talks about how the poverty she witnessed in Pakistan shaped her life. Illustrations of Lamisse and Fatima by Anna Apuli accompany this piece.

Living legends Clem Ford and Amy Gray need no introduction individually, and they also have a fantastic friendship. In this piece we are privy to a weeks-long messenger chat bubble in which they chat, laugh, rant, and rave all things feminism.

Anna Apuli records an in-conversation with two academics – Dr Kim Peters and Dr Courtney von Hippel – about their research into overcoming gender stereotypes in the workplace. From doctors to labourers and everything in between, this is a chat that will make you laugh and teach you a lot.

Emma Kate Lewis interviews Carley Kilpatrick, a Senior Conservation Officer for Queensland Parks and Wildlife Services, about the Grey Nurse Shark Watch Project. They talk about the difficulties of being a woman in STEMM and about how it took a woman’s fresh perspective to help save the endangered species. Their meeting at the University of Queensland is photographed by Alana Potts.

Grace McCarter’s memoir ‘Lost, More Than Once’ is about her moment of realisation that she had been attributing the occasion she lost her virginity to a man, when in fact it happened years earlier with a woman. Her writing is about grappling with her bisexual identity in a heterosexual society, and original illustrations by Anna Apuli accompany the piece.

In a brilliantly fun fashion shoot, Alana Potts photographed Golda Guido wearing Multicultural Boob Revolution’s generous array of jewellery. The images are accompanied by a profile of Multicultural Boob Revolution by Bri Lee.