Q&A: Jasmine Fairbairn

Q&A: Jasmine Fairbairn

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This Friday night, comedian Jasmine Fairbairn will form part of The Comedy Conglomerate, a night of standup comedy hosted by Changer Studios and held at Brisbane’s Metro Arts. We caught up with Jasmine ahead of her set to learn more about how she started and developed her career, and what she’s most looking forward to on the evening.

Can you tell me a bit about who you are and what you do?

I’m a Canadian improviser, Mom, and stand up comedian who spends most days watching as much reality TV as I possibly can.

Can you pinpoint the moment you knew you wanted to get into stand up?

I suppose the moment I knew I wanted to do stand up was as a kid watching Robin Williams: At The Met. I memorised all of his bits, and then would perform them for my friends, whose parents were horrified because I was only 10. I did the same thing with Eddie Murphy’s Delirious, and I was obsessed with Gilda Radner on SNL. My dad had all of these box sets, Best of SNL, from the 70’s.

I didn’t know I was capable of actually doing stand up until much, much later. I did around 10 years of improvisation at Loose Moose Theatre in Calgary, and I always loved it, but it wasn’t until I did that first stand up set that I felt something click in my brain. Like, “Yes! This is what I’ve been missing!”

What’s been the most challenging part of your career to date?

I’d say the writing has been the most challenging thing for me. I was trained in improvisation, so I always just thought I’d go up there and say stuff off the top of my head. Anyone who does stand up will tell you: rarely does that work. I’ve always shied away from writing, and was told I wasn’t very good at it, so the idea that I’m supposed to write things out and work them on paper has always been daunting. I’ve tried to come up with a happy medium of working things out on stage and on paper, but I know that my writing can use more attention and work.

What’s given you the greatest sense of achievement?

At first just getting out of the house was an achievement!

But, as I get on and do more and more gigs, I feel like the best way to look at it is that I learn something from every gig and so that’s an achievement. Sounds so lame, but waiting for recognition and ‘fame’ for a sense of achievement means you’ll wait a long time.

I guess the first time I got paid for doing comedy felt like I had accomplished something for all the hard work I put into it.

What are you most looking forward to about Friday night?

Friday night is going to be an awesome night.

It’s an excellent line up in an excellent venue with people who actually want to be there. Which is not always the case – it’s a treat to not have a TAB shouting in the background and a man who is angry because I’m blocking the TV.

I love all the other comedians on the line up. They’re all different and hilarious. I’m very lucky to be in it!

What’s next for you, career-wise?

Hopefully more of this! I just want to keep getting better and better. I don’t have aspirations to take over the planet and Netflix all the specials. I just want to be someone that people want to come and see and laugh until their faces hurt.


Answers by Jasmine Fairburn
Questions and Edits by Emma Kate Lewis

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