Yusa Cui for ‘Art Meets Commerce’

We’re partnering with The Print Bar on a new conversation series called ‘Art Meets Commerce’. Their business helps artists turn their work into saleable, wearable, and shareable items. They also have a strong track-record for supporting women’s work, and from Issue #5 onwards they are sponsoring each of our Featured Artists! If you’ve got a copy of Issue #5 on hand (and if you don’t, you should definitely shop either a print or digital copy), flip to the second spread and take in Yusa Cui’s work as the illustrator and designer behind our double-page spread advertisement for The Print Bar. Yusa is a design student at RMIT University (Melbourne, Australia) who hopes to pursue both commercial design jobs as well as more creative and experimental illustrative works. Follow her work on instagram here.


HCwBB: What kind of other creatives would you like to work with to expand your art practice?

Yusa Cui: I’m a person who likes doing things with my hands, and I’m particularly interested in traditional printmaking techniques like screen-printing, monoprinting, and lithography. I really enjoy and appreciate the unexpected outcomes that can occur during the handcrafting processes. I think it would be great to do more work with these techniques or with creatives who work in these areas.

HCwBB: How do you see yourself selling your art or creative expertise in the near future?

YC: I think I’d like to sell art and do design work at the same time. For a long time my goal was to produce a series of complete and exquisite artworks for my portfolio because I wanted to apply for an in-house illustration job. But recently I’m more drawn to do artworks that really fulfill me—works that may not necessarily fit in a commercial context. I’ve still got half a year until graduation, so before facing the real world I’d like to enjoy working on my own projects a bit more. I want to try to make my freelancing more profitable.

HCwBB: What kind of mediums would you like to see your art printed onto?

YC: I’m open to anything, really. I used to prefer my art printed on paper, like on publications or magazines, but now I also like to see them on usable items. It is always such a delight to see people wearing or using things that have your works printed on them.


HCwBB: How did you end up creating your zine? Talk us through the digital-to-IRL process for you?

YC: The zine was actually for one of my school assignments. It records my journey of doing an outback light show in Mildura last year with my peers. We gathered loads of materials, took them all the way there, we did doodles, attended events, and took lots of photos. Then we came back to Melbourne and integrated the materials into zines as a kind of creative review. It was really challenging because I had a lot of assessment due at the end of the semester. I only had one week to finish the whole zine—from conceiving layouts, creating more drawings, designing, and printing them out and binding them. It was intensive but the pressure drove me to completely focus on my artwork. Sometimes I think it’s beneficial for an artist to be under pressure like that. And the result came out pretty good too!

One of my friends who is running an indie publishing house in China saw my work and asked my if I’d like to sell my zine in their store and (apart from commissions) that’s how I started to make my artwork profitable.


HCwBB: If money weren’t a problem, how would you make and share your work in the long-term?

YC: I would like to create work that truly interests me. Maybe I’d like to take the random inspirations that pop up in my head and make them into physical forms and share them with others. I think it will be quite hard to be completely financially independent by just selling my finished works as products. On the other hand, commissioned works would make me feel more financially secure, but that process works differently from just creating fun things for my own benefit. So you can see that sometimes those two different ways of working make my creative styles looks different. My doodles would be more experimental and casual.

Comment

This post doesn't have any comment. Be the first one!

hide comments
Follow
...
Back

Your cart

0

No products in the cart.

Total
$0.00
Checkout
Empty

This is a unique website which will require a more modern browser to work!

Please upgrade today!